first_imgBlockchain is the technology that Bitcoin is built on, but the technology of cryptocoins is beginning to be applied to almost every industry.  There are three benefits that blockchain brings to advantage over traditional accounting and tracking methods:Transparency – everyone has access to the same data and can check the validity of a transactionDecentralization – data is not controlled by one single entitySecurity – Blockchain data is secure because of the high-level of encryption used for storing the dataDavid Schatsky, managing director at Deloitte LLP, said that “today, you can’t live your life without a mobile phone. In a few years you will have to participate in one or more blockchain solutions because they’re just more efficient and lower cost.”How can Blockchain help logistics?:Monitoring Supply Chain – Track the quantity and movement of assets like pallets, trailers and containers.Monitoring Documentation – Track purchase orders, changes orders, receipts, shipping and trade-related documentsMonitoring Processes – Track process to verify processing steps, like for certification of organic or kosher handlingShared Information – Manufacturers, vendors and suppliers have access to process, assembly, delivery and maintenance informationBill Fearnley, Jr., research director for IDC’s Worldwide Blockchain Strategies, said that “if you build a blockchain ledger within [a single company] that has a certain value. The real value for blockchain is when you use distributed electronic ledgers and data to connect with suppliers, customers and intermediaries.”last_img read more

first_img HomeWeb DesignGetting Started With VR Interface Design Related postsInclusive Components: Book Reviews And Accessibility Resources13th December 2019Should Your Portfolio Site Be A PWA?12th December 2019Struggling To Get A Handle On Traffic Surges10th December 2019Building A CSS Layout: Live Stream With Rachel Andrew10th December 2019How To Design Profitable Sales Funnels On Mobile6th December 2019How To Build A Real-Time Multiplayer Virtual Reality Game (Part 2)5th December 2019 Posted on 7th February 2017Web Design FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+share The virtual realm is uncharted territory for many designers. In the last few years, we’ve witnessed an explosion in virtual reality (VR) hardware and applications. VR experiences range from the mundane to the wondrous, their complexity and utility varying greatly.Taking your first steps into VR as a UX or UI designer can be daunting. We know because we’ve been there. But fear not! In this article, we’ll share a process for designing VR apps that we hope you’ll use to start designing for VR yourself. You don’t need to be an expert in VR; you just need to be willing to apply your skills to a new domain. Ultimately, as a community working together, we can accelerate VR to reach its full potential faster.The post Getting Started With VR Interface Design appeared first on Smashing Magazine.From our sponsors: Getting Started With VR Interface Design Getting Started With VR Interface DesignYou are here:last_img read more

first_imgThe Senate Finance Committee (SFC) began a markup of its tax reform proposal on November 13, starting a committee debate that is expected to last most of the week. Senate Republicans released a Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT) description of the Chairman’s Mark of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Bill last week .Markup Kicks OffThe first day consisted largely of members’ opening statements on the GOP proposal. As expected, Republicans praised the measure while Democrats criticized it.“What started out as a promise of a significant middle class tax cut has become a multi-trillion dollar bait and switch. A massive handout to multinational corporations and a bonanza for tax cheats and powerful political donors,” SFC ranking member Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said. In particular, Wyden criticized the GOP proposal for increasing taxes on the middle class. Additionally, Wyden condemned the GOP’s choice to craft a partisan bill rather than work with Democrats.Bipartisan IdeasIn his opening remarks, SFC Chairman Orrin G. Hatch, R-Tex., stated that many of the tax reform provisions in the bill were proposals that Democrats supported in the past. He also pointed to a number of areas on which Republicans and Democrats agree. These areas include keeping deductions for mortgage interest and charitable contributions, as well as popular retirement savings programs such as 401(k)s and Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs).However, Hatch also remarked that it was “the Democrats’ own preconditions that kept them from engaging on tax reform. There was an open seat at the negotiating table; they collectively chose not to sit in it,” Hatch added. He made direct reference to an August 1 letter from 45 Senate Democrats listing “prerequisites to any bipartisan tax reform effort.”Changes to ComeHatch noted that the Chairman’s Mark, as originally introduced, would not pass Senate reconciliation requirements. Thus, the current tax reform proposals could not be permanent. “We are, of course, aware of this problem and are working to ensure that the reduce rates and additional reforms designed to bring investment back to the United States and create more American jobs remain in place past the 10-year budget window,” Hatch said.To that end, a modified Chairman’s Mark is expected to be released on November 14, according to SFC staff. Generally, modifications include amendments that were filed and other changes. As of the afternoon on November 13, 355 amendments had been filed. A full discussion of the GOP proposal is scheduled for November 14. JCT and committee staff will be present. While debate and votes on amendments could come as early as Tuesday, they are expected to begin November 15. The “goal” is to have the bill approved by the committee by the end of the week, SFC staff told reporters.By Jessica Jeane, Wolters Kluwer News StaffWant to know more? Join Wolters Kluwer Principal Analyst Mark Luscombe on Nov. 29 for Tax Legislation Update: Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, a 2-CPE webinar from CCH® CPElink. Mark will present a complete discussion of the proposed legislation and its impact on taxpayers.Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

first_img Alzheimer’s protein may spread like an infection, human brain scans suggest The average accumulation of tau protein, represented by the red spheres, as visualized during positron emission tomography scans of 17 subjects with Alzheimer’s disease. Thomas Cope For the first time, scientists have produced evidence in living humans that the protein tau, which mars the brain in Alzheimer’s disease, spreads from neuron to neuron. Although such movement wasn’t directly observed, the finding may illuminate how neurodegeneration occurs in the devastating illness, and it could provide new ideas for stemming the brain damage that robs so many of memory and cognition.Tau is one of two proteins—along with β-amyloid—that form unusual clumps in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. Scientists have long debated which is most important to the condition and, thus, the best target for intervention. Tau deposits are found inside neurons, where they are thought to inhibit or kill them, whereas β-amyloid forms plaques outside brain cells.Researchers at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom combined two brain imaging techniques, functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) scanning, in 17 Alzheimer’s patients to map both the buildup of tau and their brains’ functional connectivity—that is, how spatially separated brain regions communicate with each other. Strikingly, they found the largest concentrations of the damaging tau protein in brain regions heavily wired to others, suggesting that tau may spread in a way analogous to influenza during an epidemic, when people with the most social contacts will be at greatest risk of catching the disease. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The research team says this pattern, described yesterday in Brain, supports something known as the “transneuronal spread” hypothesis for Alzheimer’s disease, which had previously been demonstrated in mice but not people. “We come down quite strongly in favor of the idea that tau is starting in one place and moving across neurons and synapses to other places,” says clinical neurologist Thomas Cope, one of the study’s authors. “That has never before been shown in humans. That’s very exciting.” Because the researchers looked at Alzheimer’s patients with a range of disease severity, they were also able to demonstrate that, when tau accumulation was higher, brain regions were on the whole less connected. The strength of connections also decreased, and connections were increasingly random.Nathan Spreng, a neuroscientist who studies brain networks and Alzheimer’s disease at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital in Canada, calls the evidence for an infectionlike spread of tau “fascinating and compelling.” But others note that the study did not follow patients across time, a big weakness that makes it difficult to conclude that “tau spreading” caused the decreased functional connectivity, says Jorge Sepulcre of Harvard Medical School in Boston, who uses PET scanning to probe the impacts of neurodegenerative diseases on brain network connectivity. “The study’s conclusions should be taken cautiously as they do not include longitudinal proof or validation about the spreading nature of tau,” he says.Yet the global picture of deterioration in the study makes it valuable, Spreng says. “While animal work has looked at how [tau] spread happens from synapse to synapse, this study shows nicely what the brain-wide effects are as the networks start to degenerate in the context of progressive Alzheimer’s disease.” He notes, however, that the small sample size is a concern.Although he’s confident his team has already demonstrated the transneuronal spread of tau, Cope says that the Cambridge group is now following larger numbers of subjects with Alzheimer’s and tracking individuals across time with brain imaging. The spread of tau could have implications for clinical care, he adds, if drugs can be developed that attack tau in synapses, outside of cells, locking it up inside affected cells early, before it can spread. By Meredith WadmanJan. 5, 2018 , 2:05 PMlast_img read more

first_imgMS Dhoni takes the bails off to run David Miller out.India have surprised everyone with their agile fielding in the World Cup so far and it was more prominent in the game against South Africa, which they won by convincing 130 runs.”India in the last six to seven years have been better fielding team than 15 years ago,” said former West Indies fast bowler Michael Holding.India started their World Cup campaign with a bang by beating Pakistan and in the next game against favourites South Africa came out with flying colours in every department, especially the ground fielding and catching.”In ground fielding India have improved in recent years. It was extraordinary (against Proteas),” Ian Chappell said.In the match against South Africa, India managed two run outs of AB de Villiers and David Miller. The big wicket of De Villers off a Mohit Sharma throw turned the match completely in India’s favour.”I have seen Mohit. His fielding is impressive. So, it is important to pick him,” former India batsman Sunil Gavaskar noted.India’s team director, Ravi Shastri was also mighty impressed with his side’s athletic fielding in the last two matches. “Fielding was fabulous. You would think it was Aussie or South Africa not Indian players fielding.”The presence of youngsters in the team has also brought a lot of difference to India’s fielding – Ajinkya Rahane, Virat Kohli, Suresh Raina, Ravindra Jadeja and Rohit Sharma in the circle make up for a brilliant fielding unit.last_img read more

first_imgzoom The Gulf of Guinea, South East Asia and The Indian Ocean High Risk Area (HRA) have all seen a significant reduction of reported maritime crime throughout July, August and September of this year, according to data released by UK’s maritime intelligence and operations company Dryad Maritime.With the exception of the Sulu Sea, incidents of maritime crime in South East Asia are at their lowest since 2009 and in the Indian Ocean HRA there were no confirmed acts of piracy in Q3, with the last recorded incident of piracy reported on a merchant vessel in 2014.In the Gulf of Guinea and within Nigeria’s Economic Exclusion Zone (EEZ) there has been a decrease in the frequency of attacks with a total of just four attacks against commercial shipping at sea off the Niger Delta since early July, this compares to 36 in the first six months of the year.Despite this quarter’s positive statistics, the analysis is released with the caveat that expectations for the remainder of the year, especially in relation to the GoG, should be tempered, according to Dryad Maritime.“We have cause for some optimism on piracy and maritime crime, with a generally stable and improving situation in some areas balanced against some serious cause for concern in others,” Ian Millen, Chief Operating Officer at Dryad Maritime, said.He added that in the Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean, Somali piracy remains broadly contained and, in Southeast Asia, piracy is at its lowest level since 2009, with a 65% reduction when compared to this time last year.“The bad news, however, is that 81 people have been kidnapped, 7 have been killed and 61 remain in captivity,” Millen said.Additionally, Dryad Maritime reported that beyond piracy and maritime crime, the maritime domain poses other threats.Millen said that, from conflict situations ashore in Libya and Yemen, to the threat of anti-ship missiles in busy shipping lanes, as evidenced by recent incidents in the southern Red Sea, “seafarers continue to trade and transit in some dangerous waters,” while the continuing humanitarian crisis of Mediterranean migration puts other pressures on the shipping industry and its seafarers.last_img read more

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Fincantieri Italian shipbuilder Fincantieri delivered the cruise ship Viking Jupiter to cruise line Viking from its Ancona shipyard on February 7.Viking Jupiter, which can accommodate 930 passengers, is the sixth of overall 16 units Fincantieri is set to deliver to Viking.With a gross tonnage of about 47,800 tons, the vessel is a part of the small cruise ship segment. The keel-laying ceremony for the ship was held in October 2017.The first of the series, Viking Star, was built at the shipyard in Marghera and delivered in 2015. The other units, Viking Sea, Viking Sky, Viking Sun, and Viking Orion, handed over in 2016, 2017 and 2018, were all built at the Ancona yard.Other 10 units, options included, for Viking Cruises will take to the sea from the group’s Italian yards between 2021 and 2027.Working with Vard, Fincantieri is also entering the expedition vessels segment and has acquired an order from Viking for two special cruise ships which will be built in the group’s yards, the company said.last_img read more

first_imgThe Canadian PressA coastal British Columbia First Nation that experienced a spill of thousands of litres of diesel in its waters is supporting the province’s efforts to create a permitting system for companies transporting hazardous substances.The B.C. Court of Appeal is hearing a reference case filed by the province that asks whether it can create such a system, which would require companies to file disaster management plans and agree to pay for any damages.Marilyn Slett, chief of the Heiltsuk Nation, said her community’s experience revealed gaps in federal spill response. The sunken tug Nathan E. Stewart spilled 110,000 litres of diesel fuel near Bella Bella in late 2016.“The day the spill happened, our people were out there. They were out in their boats, they were there trying to help with any of the recovery. What we noticed is there isn’t room for Indigenous people and Indigenous governance within the spill response regime,” she said in an interview.B.C. concluded its arguments before the Appeal Court on Tuesday. A lawyer representing the province said the proposed changes to its Environmental Management Act won’t allow B.C. to refuse a permit to a pipeline operator without cause.The governments of Canada, Alberta and Saskatchewan have not yet had an opportunity to deliver arguments in court, but they say Ottawa – not provinces – has jurisdiction over inter-provincial projects such as the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.Canada says in court documents that the proposed amendments must be struck down because they give the province a “veto” over such projects.Slett said she believes that if B.C.’s proposed system had been in place when the Nathan E. Stewart sank, the recovery would be further along now. She also hopes the province’s regime, if approved, will incorporate Indigenous knowledge of their territories.“Our people know our areas. They know the tides. They know the weather patterns,” she said.The Heiltsuk have joined other First Nations, the B.C. cities of Vancouver and Burnaby, Ecojustice and the Assembly of First Nations in supporting B.C.’s proposal in court.In court documents, the Assembly of First Nations says the answers to the constitutional questions in the case will have far-reaching consequences for Indigenous Peoples when it comes to natural resources and energy activities on their lands.“The proposed hazardous substance permits must be interpreted in a way that the rights and authorities of First Nation peoples are recognized, respected and part of the construction process,” it says.Front linesThe City of Vancouver says in court documents that local and First Nations governments are on the front lines of emergency response and will suffer the impacts of a heavy oil spill.“The proposed amendments recognize the important role that emergency preparedness and response planning by local governments and First Nation governments will play in the event of an accidental release of heavy oil and the need to ensure that they are properly resourced to respond,” it says.Joseph Arvay, a lawyer for B.C., told court on Tuesday the proposed amendments only allow the province to refuse to issue a permit or revoke one in cases where the operator fails to follow conditions imposed upon it.He added that if the operator finds the conditions too onerous, it can appeal to the independent Environmental Appeal Board, or in the case of Trans Mountain, the National Energy Board.The energy board has set up a process where Trans Mountain Corp. can argue that a condition is too burdensome and violates the special status of inter-provincial projects, he said.“The NEB effectively gets the last word … but it’s going to be condition by condition, law by law,” Arvay told the panel of five judges.Arvay said the law would be unconstitutional if it declared an absolute prohibition on pipelines in B.C., but the amendments only impose conditions on trans-boundary projects.When Premier John Horgan announced the proposed changes last year, Alberta Premier Rachel Notley accused him of breaking the rules of Confederation and declared a short-lived ban on B.C. wines.The federal government has purchased the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, which would triple the capacity of the existing line from the Edmonton area to Burnaby and increase tanker traffic in Burrard Inlet seven-fold.Trans Mountain Corp., the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, Enbridge Inc., the Railway Association of Canada and the Lax Kw’alaams Indian Band are among those that have filed court documents in support of the Canadian government in the reference case.last_img read more