first_imgTo respond to all of Andrew Hopper’s and Greg Treverton-Jones’s points about the Solicitors Regulation Authority’s prosecution policy, ‘Ticking all the boxes?’ (see [2010] Gazette, 1 April, 12), would be a major undertaking, but two key issues need addressing. First, it is simply not true that the SRA prosecutes ‘on the basis that any breach of the rules is deserving of a sanction’. On the contrary, the vast majority of rule breaches that we identify attract no formal sanction at all and are frequently addressed by using guidance and advice. Second, the SRA’s proposals for outcomes-focused regulation (OFR) – on which we are launching a debate throughout the profession from May – are indeed designed to ensure that both the SRA as the regulator and members of the profession concentrate upon issues which matter to clients rather than the minutiae of over-detailed rules. Part of OFR will be the publication of a new draft enforcement policy, on which we shall consult – I think it a safe bet that early respondents to that consultation will be messrs Treverton-Jones and Hopper. Antony Townsend, Chief executive, SRAlast_img read more

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

first_imgIn the past we did not have our own independent services in the air, ocean and distribution divisions in south and south-east Asia,” says Uwe Oemmelen, a member of the Rhenus Board. “Through the Pro-Log Group we will also obtain expertise in the third-party logistics field in Asia. As a result, we will be able to offer our customers more comprehensive services there.” Rhenus will fully take over the Pro-Log business locations in China and Hong Kong. “We will then have a much stronger Rhenus Logistics Asia-Pacific Ltd as a result,” says Uwe Oemmelen.By taking a holding in the Pro-Log Group, regional turnover for Rhenus will rise by approximately USD50 million and this sum will be generated by almost 600 employees at 19 business locations. Following this acquisition, Rhenus will have its own offices for business operations at 32 locations in Asia.The Pro-Log Group primarily operates in south and south-east Asia and has its own companies in Singapore, the Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand and India. The company has been a partner for Rhenus Freight Logistics, particularly in the air and ocean divisions, in the past. Pro-Log has been handling significant transportation volumes between Europe and south/south-east Asia for some years. This joint venture will enable Rhenus to strengthen its presence in Asia to a significant degree and will also help develop the market in this region for the Rhenus brand.Meanwhile, M+R Spedag Group has acquired and will integrate PL Shipping & Logistics Pvt Ltd of India into its group of companies. There will be no changes in the organisational structure of PL Shipping & Logistics with Ramkumar continuing as managing director and Jayaram as the chief operating officer, with Daniel Richner taking over as chairman. The company will continue to exist under the same name for the next few months and the initial period will be used for the integration of the two organisations. Rhenus says this integration will provide customers and agent partners access to an extended Asian network, enhanced IT capabilities and a wider scope of services.last_img read more

first_imgThis follows the news posted by HLPFI on December 23 that a memorandum of understanding regarding the purchase had been signed by the two parties. According to an announcement on the Singapore stock exchange, the agreement will lead to Pan Ocean being recapitalised through a debt for equity swap, with an undertaking fund of more than KRW1 trillion (USD900 million) available to repay the rehabilitation claim and renumerate the financial advisor of the company.  www.panocean.comlast_img

first_imgLammy: changing pleas a ‘problem’Lammy told the Gazette: ‘What we know is a not guilty plea is higher for BAME defendants. The consequences of a not guilty plea are significant in terms of jail time and cost to the system… My challenge to the profession is not to be defensive; to recognise that this is a significant issue.’Lammy, who was called to the bar in 1994, said that barristers have more Crown court advocacy experience. Having spoken to several BAME defendants who changed their plea, he said: ‘The problem of not guilty pleas has been a problem for decades. If anything, the inability to choose your solicitor has made the problem worse, not better. I came up with suggestions. Others will have their own suggestions.’Areas Lammy would like to see explored include issues involving Muslim women, who experience ‘serious stigmatisation and isolation’ once they leave prison, and children of BAME women, who are often taken into care and potentially come through the system at a later stage.Ruling out the need for an formal public inquiry, Lammy said: ‘What we now need is to get on with action. Let’s go and do some things, change some things, let’s be radical. Let’s deal with the problem of prosecutions, recognise that giving [young] BAME people a criminal record has significant consequences not just for them but for society as a whole. Let’s recognise the criminal justice system is lagging behind the health service, the education service, in terms of diverse men and women at the top of the profession, and engage in positive action to make some change.’The government has committed to taking action on four aspects of the review. These include publishing all criminal justice databases held on ethnicity by default. Lammy said he expects the Ministry of Justice to respond to all 35 of his recommendations by the end of the year.Lammy has been approached by publishers to turn his 108-page review into a book. David Lammy MP has challenged solicitors not to be defensive over his suggestion that earlier access to barristers’ advice could help restore trust in the criminal justice system.The Labour MP for Tottenham was commissioned by the government last year to lead an independent probe into possible racial bias against black, Asian and ethnic minority (BAME) people across the system. His final report, published last month, highlighted a lack of trust in legal aid solicitors among white and BAME defendants. In some cases, this lack of trust led defendants to plead not guilty and elect for a Crown court jury trial.last_img read more

first_imgUK: Transport Minister Lord Adonis accompanied Southeastern Managing Director Charles Horton on a special trip from Ashford to St Pancras International on board a Hitachi Class 395 trainset on December 12. Marking the start of a one-year countdown to the launch of high speed domestic services on High Speed 1 in December 2009, the trip took 37 min compared with present Ashford – London timings of more than an hour. The train is the second of four pre-production trainsets being tested ahead of delivery of the rest of the 29-strong fleet – the first eight cars in the production fleet are due to reach the port of Southampton from Japan in late January. At the moment the trains are still the property of Hitachi, and the first handover to Southeastern is not envisaged until mid-April. Southeastern is currently training more than 100 drivers on the Class 395 fleet, which is fitted with TVM430 train control and KVB train protection equipment for operation on HS1. Each train has 348 one-class seats in six air-conditioned pressure-sealed cars. Southeastern Commercial Director Vince Lucas said that the service is ‘an opportunity to offer passengers more choice’; the company plans to publish its draft December 2009 timetable on its website in the near future. Chiaki Ueda, Executive General Manager of Hitachi Europe Ltd’s Rail Group, said that ‘everything is running to time’.last_img read more

first_imgMigrants Crisis: More Migrants Arrive In Sicily 25 Egyptian illegal migrants drown en route to Europe A bus with migrants drives away from the DFDS ferry, in the harbour of Vlaardingen, The Netherlands on November 19, 2019, after 25 stowaways were found onboard. PHOTO | MARCO DE SWART | ANP | AFP A bus with migrants drives away from the DFDS ferry, in the harbour of Vlaardingen, The Netherlands on November 19, 2019, after 25 stowaways were found onboard. PHOTO | MARCO DE SWART | ANP | AFPA ferry crew found 25 migrants in a refrigerated container on a boat sailing from the bus to Britain on Tuesday, emergency services said.The cargo vessel bound for Felixstowe returned to the Dutch port of Vlaardingen, near Rotterdam, as soon as the stowaways were found, they said in a statement.The people found in the container received medical attention at the port and two were taken to hospital for further treatment for possible hypothermia.The discovery comes the month after 39 Vietnamese people were found dead in a refrigerated truck in Britain, again laying bare the risks of illegal migrant routes to Europe.“On board a ship it turned out that several people were found in a cooling container. The ship returned to the harbour,” said the Rotterdam region emergency services on Twitter.“The 25 people were taken off the ship and given the medical care they need. Earlier the message came from the ship that no people died.“Two people were transported to hospital for extra medical care. Twenty-three people were transferred to a police location after a medical check-up.”DFDS Seaways, which operates the cargo ferry, said that the migrants had come on board on a lorry trailer, De Telegraaf newspaper said.The driver of the truck had been arrested, it added.A bus took away the mainly male group, some of whom were wrapped in silver thermal blankets.Their nationalities were not immediately known.Relatedcenter_img Eight refugees found inside refrigerated truck in Spainlast_img read more

first_imgHologram has released the world’s first open source modem for cellular IoT connectivity – Nova. The Nova toolkit includes the 4G LTE Cat-M ready Nova USB modem, an SDK for edge computing, and access to Hologram’s industry leading global cellular network.Hologram’s powerful combination of software, open hardware and connectivity gives enterprises the power to easily integrate cellular connectivity into new products and services.The software behind Nova is compatible with most single board computers, including Raspberry Pi, Beaglebone and more. The Nova comes in 2G/3G and 4G LTE Cat-M variants. This open source design leverages Hologram’s global software defined cellular network to provide connectivity on over 600 carriers in over 200 countries. The core component is the industrial grade u-blox SARA, enabling wide range of IoT applications, from automotive to aviation. Nova ships with FCC, PTCRB, CE, AT&T, and Verizon certifications. The global cellular IoT market is expected to reach USD 9.65 billion by 2025, according to a new study by Grand View Research, Inc, and the ability for IoT devices to securely connect, disconnect, send data, receive data, and triangulate location based on cell tower distance, is becoming increasingly valuable.In addition to open sourcing the Nova, Hologram also announces the new, open source version of Dash, their original Kickstarter product from 2014. The new global Dash features extreme deep sleep and power optimization modes, making it ideal for remote deployments and industrial sensing applications.The Hologram Nova is available online at the Hologram Store, launching first with the Nova Global 3G/2G (U201) and the Nova LTE Cat-M1 (U404) available for engineering samples before the end of the year. Click here to know more.last_img read more

first_imgPriceless works with survivors who are currently being trafficked, or have been trafficked within the past five years. The program helps these women connect to resources throughout our state, resources ranging from: emergency and long-term housing, counseling, medical and legal services, job training, education completion, relocation services, mobile food pantry connections, etc. They will discuss warning signs of a person in danger of exploitation, and how to engage in local anti-trafficking efforts. Priceless will be hosting an Anti-Human Trafficking Event, at the Nikiski Community and Recreation Center, Thursday, November 2, from 6-8 p.m. Story as aired:center_img Over 80 survivors have been referred into Priceless since it began in 2012. These survivors and their families are in need of every resource necessary for rescue and a new future. FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Sex trafficking is one of the fastest-growing, and most lucrative crimes in Alaska. One organization is drawing attention and awareness to this growing epidemic. Mature content will be presented during the event and Priceless recommends parental discretion for teens younger than 16.last_img read more