first_imgShare on Facebook Researchers from the MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology (MRC CDN) at King´s College London, led by Prof. Oscar Marín, have identified the mechanisms guiding interneurons to the striatum, a major brain centre involved in the coordination of body movement and motivation.These results, published in Journal of Neuroscience in collaboration with investigators from the Instituto de Neurociencias in Alicante (Spain), also reveal the molecule nature of the cues regulating the migration of striatal interneurons.During development, the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), a transitory brain structure, produces several populations of GABAergic inhibitory neurons, including cortical and striatal interneurons. While most research studies have focused on the migration of interneurons to the cortex, very little is known about the mechanisms through which interneurons colonise the striatum. Both cortical and striatal interneurons can be attracted by Nrg1 sources present in the cerebral cortex and the striatum. Therefore, the segregation of these two populations of interneurons must depend on repulsive signals that prevent the colonization of regions outside their final target. LinkedIn Share Share on Twittercenter_img Email Experiments carried out by the group of Prof. Marín demonstrated that striatal interneurons are repelled by the cerebral cortex through a mechanism that involves Eph/ephrins signalling. This new study also showed that responsiveness of MGE-derived striatal interneurons to attractive and repulsive cues is at least in part controlled by the postmitotic activity of the transcription factor Nkx2-1. These results reveal parallel mechanisms of target chemoattraction and off-target chemorepulsion for the migration of interneurons to the cortex and striatum. Pinterestlast_img read more

first_imgOur team’s work includes regulation of development in the seas around England. In terms of offshore projects this includes determining applications for renewable energy developments, including the construction of offshore generating stations such as wind farms, wave and tidal devices with a capacity up to 100 megawatts. We also have certain powers under section 36 of the Electricity Act 1989 to consent electricity generation from these renewable energy installations.One such application we’ve recently approved was from Seatricity Ltd. This permits them to build and deploy their Oceanus 2 device for testing at Wave Hub, a government-funded offshore renewable energy testing site 16km off the north coast of Cornwall. The Wave Hub is a purpose-built site that has four berths for testing renewable energy technology such as devices that generate energy from waves at sea.Our approval means the device can be tested for up to 12 months. This is an exciting development as the device may become the first to be plugged into the Wave Hub infrastructure. It may also lead to an application for the first major array of such devices in the UK.Press Release, May 13, 2014; Image: Seatricity Craig Loughlin of the Marine Management Organisation’s (MMO) offshore marine licensing team discusses their recent approval of a wave energy development off the north coast of Cornwall:last_img read more